Quick, throw your CDs away! There’s a roadblock!

I recently contributed an article on LoyarBurok, a prominent Malaysian BLawg, regarding the powers of the police and the enforcement division of the Domestic Trade and Consumer Affairs Ministry’s (now the Ministry of Domestic Trade, Co-operatives And Consumerism. Some of you may have received the following emails below:

To all those CDs lover pls beware!

Please do not keep any pirated or burned CDs, DVDs, or VCDs in your car.

Police and Domestic Trade & Consumer Affairs Ministry’s enforcement division in Malaysia have started the operation to search and fine anyone who keep pirated disc inside their car especially through road block at all main road and expressways.

If any pirated or burned disc found inside your car will be charged RM400 per disc. Example 30 discs found means the fine will be RM12,000.

This is real. Another friend of mine from Seagate, today during lunch time, 5 CD x RM400 = RM2,000

One of the Plexus colleague brother-in-law caught by Police due to pirated CD in the car on the way to town for lunch with his friend in the afternoon. One CD fined RM400.

Please disseminate this to all your friends who are driving in Malaysia

Fehmes lawyer Edmund Bon asked me to address this issue and I subsequently wrote a short article on it. It is published at this page.

For the past few months, an email has been circulating alleging that police and the enforcement division of the Domestic Trade and Consumer Affairs Ministry’s (now the Ministry of Domestic Trade, Co-operatives And Consumerism) have started operations to search and fine anyone who keeps pirated discs inside their cars. The email alleges that these operations were carried out through roadblocks at main roads and expressways, and that persons caught in possession of pirated discs were fined RM400 per disc.

In fact, these stories have been circulating for some time now. A report in the Sun newspaper in April 2009 stated that the police set out roadblocks to nab anyone with pirated discs. However, the same report stated that the Ministry denied having such roadblocks being set up.

Whether or not such roadblocks have been set up, it leaves us with the question: Do the police or the Ministry have the power to search our vehicles for pirated discs?

Section 24 of the Police Act 1967 allows any police officer to stop and search without warrant any vehicle which he has reasonable grounds for suspecting is being used in the commission of any offence against any law in force. The Ministry has also authority to enter and search a vehicle without warrant provided that he has reasonable grounds for believing that delay in obtaining a search warrant would lead to the destruction of evidence.

Under section 41 of the Copyright Act 1987, it is an offence to possess, other than for private and domestic use, any infringing goods. Any person who has in his possession, custody or control three or more infringing copies of a work or recording in the same form is presumed to be in possession of such copies otherwise than for private or domestic use. This basically means that possession of a pirated disc for private and domestic use is allowed provided that the pirated disc do not exceed three or more copies of the same form.

The offence would attract a fine not less than RM2,000 and not more than RM20,000 for each infringing copy or imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years or to both.

Can the police or the Ministry stop and search your vehicle?

In short, for now, if the police or Ministry have reasonable grounds to think that you are distributing pirated goods, (e.g. if you’re suspected to be a pirated VCD/DVD seller), they can stop and search your vehicle. Otherwise, they have no authority to stop and search your vehicle for pirated discs.

This situation may soon change.

The Government recently announced plans to amend the Copyright Act 1987 to make it an offence to keep pirated goods, similar to the offence of possessing stolen goods. Although the Government has not announced the details of the amendment, such news is worrying. This basically means that anyone in possession of pirated goods is committing an offence. Hence, any police, with reasonable grounds that there are pirated goods in a vehicle, may stop and search the vehicle.

What if the driver had purchased genuine songs from the internet and had it copied into a CD? The driver would have to prove and explain that he had genuinely purchased the song.

If I had downloaded software, music or movies into my computer from the Internet, does the police or Ministry has the authority to enter my house and search my computer? Based on the proposed amendment, the police or Ministry has the authority to do so.

Guidelines to allow the authorities to stop and search a vehicle for pirated goods should be clearly spelled out and made available to the public. The public should be given the right to use or copy copyrighted materials for their private use. Certain levies or exemptions should be given to the public if they are in possession of pirated goods unintentionally.

An outright ban of unauthorised possession copyrighted materials will create fear and chaos to the country and society.

On another note, United Kingdom will be amending their copyright laws to make them fit for the internet age. According to UK Prime Minister David Cameron, the law could be relaxed to allow greater use of copyright material without the owner’s permission. (Read more here.

How unfortunate, while UK is moving forward with the Internet age, Malaysian IP laws are going backwards.

11 thoughts on “Quick, throw your CDs away! There’s a roadblock!”

    1. ST: at the current law, there is no problem. the new law shouldnt make it illegal but the problem is that certain quarters may use this law to allege that the CD they are listening is pirated. some people may just skip the hassle of proving that it originates from an original source and pay the buggers off.

    1. Darren: at this juncture, it is not wrong. it is just that the new law will open room for abuse. certain quarters may use this law to allege that the CD they are listening is pirated. some people may just skip the hassle of proving that it originates from an original source and pay the buggers off.

  1. So, conclusion it is better to have pendrive audio? when road block just pull the pendrive away from the player and put back the pendrive to pocket?

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